Updating canvas instructions declared in Python

Continuing the theme of my last few posts, a common problem for new kivy users is creating canvas instructions that follow their parent widgets. For instance, here’s some code for a custom widget that tries to draw a red rectangle in its upper-right corner - this is fairly standard kivy code to draw directly on the widget canvas, and is documented here.

from kivy.uix.widget import Widget
from kivy.graphics import Rectangle, Color

class CornerRectangleWidget(Widget)
    def __init__(self, **kwargs):
        super(CornerRectangleWidget, self).__init__(**kwargs)

        with self.canvas:
            Color(1, 0, 0, 1)  # set the colour to red
            self.rect = Rectangle(pos=self.center,
                                  size=(self.width/2.,
                                        self.height/2.))

This looks like it will create a red rectangle, whose length is half the parent size in both directions, and whose position is the parent centre.

The surprise is that this is actually not what happens. Instead, the rectangle is always positioned at (50, 50) with size (50, 50), regardless of where the widget appears.

The reason for this is that these values really are based on the pos and size of the widget at the point where the canvas code was run; all widgets have a default position of (0, 0) and size of (100, 100), and this will not necessarily be updated (for instance by a parent layout class) until after their __init__ is run. However, the Rectangle properties receive only these initial values, and don’t know about the new position of the widget.

The solution is to simply hook into kivy’s event system to update the rectangle pos and size ourselves whenever the widget changes:

from kivy.uix.widget import Widget
from kivy.graphics import Rectangle, Color

class CornerRectangleWidget(Widget)
    def __init__(self, **kwargs):
        super(CornerRectangleWidget, self).__init__(**kwargs)

        with self.canvas:
            Color(1, 0, 0, 1)  # set the colour to red
            self.rect = Rectangle(pos=self.center,
                                  size=(self.width/2.,
                                        self.height/2.))

        self.bind(pos=self.update_rect,
                  size=self.update_rect)

    def update_rect(self, *args):
        self.rect.pos = self.pos
        self.rect.size = self.size

Now whenever the widget pos or size changes, our new method is called and the rectangle resized or repositioned as necessary. It will always track the widget’s upper right corner, so we get the visual effect we were originally looking for.

Of course, an even better solution (where possible) is to use kv language:

<CornerRectangleWidget@Widget>
    canvas:
        Color:
           rgba: 1, 0, 0, 1
        Rectangle:
           pos: self.center
           size: self.width / 2., self.height / 2.

This is shorter, simpler and clearer. We don’t need to manually set up the binding because kv automatically detects that we referred to properties of the parent widget and creates it automatically - something that isn’t really possible in python. This is one reason that we recommend using kv language wherever possible.

Updating canvas instructions declared in Python

Continuing the theme of my last few posts, a common problem for new kivy users is creating canvas instructions that follow their parent widgets. For instance, here’s some code for a custom widget that tries to draw a red rectangle in its upper-right corner - this is fairly standard kivy code to draw directly on the widget canvas, and is documented here.

from kivy.uix.widget import Widget
from kivy.graphics import Rectangle, Color

class CornerRectangleWidget(Widget)
    def __init__(self, **kwargs):
        super(CornerRectangleWidget, self).__init__(**kwargs)

        with self.canvas:
            Color(1, 0, 0, 1)  # set the colour to red
            self.rect = Rectangle(pos=self.center,
                                  size=(self.width/2.,
                                        self.height/2.))

This looks like it will create a red rectangle, whose length is half the parent size in both directions, and whose position is the parent centre.

The surprise is that this is actually not what happens. Instead, the rectangle is always positioned at (50, 50) with size (50, 50), regardless of where the widget appears.

The reason for this is that these values really are based on the pos and size of the widget at the point where the canvas code was run; all widgets have a default position of (0, 0) and size of (100, 100), and this will not necessarily be updated (for instance by a parent layout class) until after their __init__ is run. However, the Rectangle properties receive only these initial values, and don’t know about the new position of the widget.

The solution is to simply hook into kivy’s event system to update the rectangle pos and size ourselves whenever the widget changes:

from kivy.uix.widget import Widget
from kivy.graphics import Rectangle, Color

class CornerRectangleWidget(Widget)
    def __init__(self, **kwargs):
        super(CornerRectangleWidget, self).__init__(**kwargs)

        with self.canvas:
            Color(1, 0, 0, 1)  # set the colour to red
            self.rect = Rectangle(pos=self.center,
                                  size=(self.width/2.,
                                        self.height/2.))

        self.bind(pos=self.update_rect,
                  size=self.update_rect)

    def update_rect(self, *args):
        self.rect.pos = self.pos
        self.rect.size = self.size

Now whenever the widget pos or size changes, our new method is called and the rectangle resized or repositioned as necessary. It will always track the widget’s upper right corner, so we get the visual effect we were originally looking for.

Of course, an even better solution (where possible) is to use kv language:

<CornerRectangleWidget@Widget>
    canvas:
        Color:
           rgba: 1, 0, 0, 1
        Rectangle:
           pos: self.center
           size: self.width / 2., self.height / 2.

This is shorter, simpler and clearer. We don’t need to manually set up the binding because kv automatically detects that we referred to properties of the parent widget and creates it automatically - something that isn’t really possible in python. This is one reason that we recommend using kv language wherever possible.

Wrapping text in Kivy’s Label

Another Kivy question that I often see (particularly recently for some reason) is about using the Label widget - how to have text wrap automatically, or the opposite, how to have the label automatically grow to accommodate its text. I’ve covered this before in the 9th Kivy crash course video, but here’s a quick write up of the basics.

The first thing to realise is how the Label works by default, it takes the text and draws it to a texture - in practical terms that’s an image of the characters. Everything you might want to do with the Label revolves around what this texture is really doing. By default, it does not wrap the text (unless you put in linebreak characters manually), it just makes one long image on a single row. This image is is placed right in the middle of the label, centered in both directions, which is fine for short text snippets but will overhang the Label on both sides if the text is too long.

This also leads to some other annoying behaviour - as well as the text not wrapping, you might have observed that the halign and valign properties seem to do nothing by default. This is because they orient things not inside the widget, but inside the texture…which is the exact size it needs to contain the text so alignments change nothing.

To solve all these problems, you can manually set the size of the texture with text_size, a tuple of width and height, e.g.

Label:
    text_size: self.size

This reverses the default behaviour - instead of the texture growing to fit the text, the text will be wrapped to fit the texture! If there is space to spare, it is aligned within the texture according to the halign and valign properties.

The Label also has another useful property, the texture_size, which holds the actual size of the texture. You can use that do bind behaviour to the size of the text. For instance, a common requirement is to create a Label that grows as long as it needs to contain its text, but which wraps it to a certain width. We can combine both of the above ideas to accomplish this:

Label:
    size_hint_y: None
    text_size: self.width, None
    height: self.texture_size[1]

If you (for instance) place this label in a ScrollView, it will be Scrollable over exactly the right distance to fit in all the text.

Wrapping text in Kivy’s Label

Another Kivy question that I often see (particularly recently for some reason) is about using the Label widget - how to have text wrap automatically, or the opposite, how to have the label automatically grow to accommodate its text. I’ve covered this before in the 9th Kivy crash course video, but here’s a quick write up of the basics.

The first thing to realise is how the Label works by default, it takes the text and draws it to a texture - in practical terms that’s an image of the characters. Everything you might want to do with the Label revolves around what this texture is really doing. By default, it does not wrap the text (unless you put in linebreak characters manually), it just makes one long image on a single row. This image is is placed right in the middle of the label, centered in both directions, which is fine for short text snippets but will overhang the Label on both sides if the text is too long.

This also leads to some other annoying behaviour - as well as the text not wrapping, you might have observed that the halign and valign properties seem to do nothing by default. This is because they orient things not inside the widget, but inside the texture…which is the exact size it needs to contain the text so alignments change nothing.

To solve all these problems, you can manually set the size of the texture with text_size, a tuple of width and height, e.g.

Label:
    text_size: self.size

This reverses the default behaviour - instead of the texture growing to fit the text, the text will be wrapped to fit the texture! If there is space to spare, it is aligned within the texture according to the halign and valign properties.

The Label also has another useful property, the texture_size, which holds the actual size of the texture. You can use that do bind behaviour to the size of the text. For instance, a common requirement is to create a Label that grows as long as it needs to contain its text, but which wraps it to a certain width. We can combine both of the above ideas to accomplish this:

Label:
    size_hint_y: None
    text_size: self.width, None
    height: self.texture_size[1]

If you (for instance) place this label in a ScrollView, it will be Scrollable over exactly the right distance to fit in all the text.

Kivy Contest 2014

Just to announce here for anyone that hasn’t seen already…Kivy recently announced the Kivy org second programming contest! You can check out all the details at http://kivy.org/#contest!

To cover the key details here, entries are open now (you can sign up at the link above), and the contest starts in full on 15th April. There will be a broad theme, announced on that day, but many different kinds of app will be possible. You’ll have 4 weeks from the start date to complete your entry.

Entries will be judged on a range of criteria, so don’t be afraid to jump in!

Kivy Contest 2014

Just to announce here for anyone that hasn’t seen already…Kivy recently announced the Kivy org second programming contest! You can check out all the details at http://kivy.org/#contest!

To cover the key details here, entries are open now (you can sign up at the link above), and the contest starts in full on 15th April. There will be a broad theme, announced on that day, but many different kinds of app will be possible. You’ll have 4 weeks from the start date to complete your entry.

Entries will be judged on a range of criteria, so don’t be afraid to jump in!

Kivy Programming Contest 2014

Kivy is organizing its second application development contest!. This is a great chance for users both new and experienced to show off their skills and compete for prizes. Entries will be judged on a range of criteria accessible to both new and experienced programmers, so don’t be afraid to dive in!

poster_1

A big big thanks to the Python Software Foundation for being our first and lovely sponsor :)

2048, in Python / Kivy

If you don’t know the 2048 puzzle yet, you should. But be careful, it’s time consuming. I won’t go on the whole clone history of the game, but will just say that if you want to play it on the Web, play to the Gabriel Cirulli 2048. The author said it wont make an official iOS/Android app, so… let’s give Kivy a try :)

device-2014-03-15-114048

Only 2 hours of coding where needed for the first published version of the game. Then i learned on the Google Play Game services APIs for integrating a leaderboard and achievements. And after a couple of hours during the night, what i can say is: Be patient! Even if you follow the documentation carefully, you need to wait few hours before your app_id works on their server, even in test mode. There never warn us about it.

When the setup is done and it start working, it is easy to login:

PythonActivity = autoclass('org.renpy.android.PythonActivity')
    GameHelper = autoclass('com.google.example.games.basegameutils.GameHelper')

    gh_instance = GameHelper(PythonActivity.mActivity, GameHelper.CLIENT_ALL)
    gh_instance_listener = GameHelperListener()
    gh_instance.setup(gh_instance_listener)
    gh_instance.onStart(PythonActivity.mActivity)
    android.activity.unbind(on_activity_result=_on_activity_result)
    android.activity.bind(on_activity_result=_on_activity_result)

That’s how you can unlock achievement:

# uid is the Google UID for the achievement you want
if gh_instance.isSignedIn():
    Games.Achievements.unlock(gh_instance.getApiClient(), uid)

And put the user score on the leaderboard:

# uid is the Google UID for the leaderboard you've created.
# You can have multiple leaderboard.
if gh_instance.isSignedIn():
    Games.Leaderboards.submitScore(gh_instance.getApiClient(), uid, score)

There is a little more code around that, but globally, using the new Play Games services APIs is now easy. I hope this little piece of code will help peoples to integrate it into their app. Somebody need to start a Python library for managing Google Play API and Game Center for iOS.

Have a look at the source code for an example of the integration with the Play Games services APIs :)


Get it on Google Play

Prepare for the Kivy contest #2

Developers, developers… rejoice!

kivy contest

The kivy project is organizing a second contest!

From the 15th of April, when the theme will be revealed, to the 15th of May, the final deadline, all the interested candidates will compete to produce the nicest application possible, once month to make the difference, and collect prices :).

Prizes will be announced before the beginning of the contest, the python software foundation kindly offered to sponsor the contest, if you are or know somebody interested in sponsoring the contest, please contact us at contest@kivy.org.

Prepare for the Kivy contest #2

Developers, developers… rejoice!

kivy contest

The kivy project is organizing a second contest!

From the 15th of April, when the theme will be revealed, to the 15th of May, the final deadline, all the interested candidates will compete to produce the nicest application possible, once month to make the difference, and collect prices :).

Prizes will be announced before the beginning of the contest, the python software foundation kindly offered to sponsor the contest, if you are or know somebody interested in sponsoring the contest, please contact us at contest@kivy.org.